Animal experiments now illegal in India

| September 11, 2012 | 0 Comments

In a move considered by animal rights activists to be long overdue, India’s government has banned experimentation on live animals in educational and research institutions. The Ministry of Environment and Forests (MoEF) has ordered colleges, universities, research institutes, hospitals and laboratories to use alternatives, including computer simulation and mannequin models, considered by the MoEF to be “superior learning tools”. Only those scientists engaging in molecular research are exempt from the ban.

The Indian Committee for the Purpose of Control and Supervision of Experiments and Animals (CPCSEA) has welcomed the ruling, saying that the committee’s members should be able to “to inspect animals housed in educational institutes, experimentation centres or technical laboratories without prior intimation to the institutes”, in order to ensure that animals used for scientific research are treated ethically.

Andrew Rowan, president of the Humane Society International, stated that India’s move should propel other countries to follow suit. “India’s decision to shift its reliance from harmful and often unreliable animal models to robust nonanimal approaches for biomedical research and education, is a major step in the right direction and they are on a path to leadership in replacing animals in experiments.”

Humane Society International research claims that in just one year, around the world, some 100 million animals are “bred, injected, infected, cut open, genetically altered, force-fed drugs, chemicals and ultimately killed for scientific research, testing and education”.

Category: Spring 2012

About the Author ()

News posts added for Independent Education by Global Latitude DMA

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *