Declining birth rate becoming a global phenomenon

| April 10, 2017 | 0 Comments

The diminishing birth rate in Taiwan is affecting higher education, says the statistics department of the country’s Education Ministry.

At other Taiwanese tertiary institutions, more than 150 higher education programmes failed to attract any enrolments this year. The government’s longer-term vision is to shut down one in three universities by 2023 as the young population slumps, because of a birth rate that is barely more than one child per woman. The increasing ageing rate in Taiwan is also a problem.

It will become the country with the greatest number of aged citizens in the world within two decades, says a demographer from the Academia Sinica in Taipei. A falling birth rate currently affects other nations as well, such as South Korea, Iran, Russia, Germany, Japan, Portugal, Spain, Ireland, Cyprus and Greece. All affected nations must deal with the fact that as fewer workers and taxpayers are born, it will become more difficult to provide services for growing numbers of senior citizens.

Writer Phillip Longman has called the phenomenon “the grey tsunami”: the moment the population over 60 years of age swamps those under 30. 

Category: Autumn 2017

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