Teaching equality: some ideas

At the International School of Cape Town (ISCT), we have created a history curriculum that focuses on factual accuracy and nurturing empathy, tolerance and understanding. We feel that our attempts to infuse some excitement into the content that we share with our young students may be of benefit to other schools.
At the ISCT we were recently fortunate enough to have on loan a replica of a Robben Island prison cell. This infamous jail was ‘home’ to so many political prisoners during apartheid. The replicated cell reinforced our ‘living history’ teaching and learning approach, as it served to educate adults and students alike about the tiny spaces from which mammoth changes were effected.
The children could see what daily life was like for some of the giants who sacrificed their freedom that we might have our democracy.
There was a sense of awe and wonder at the size of the cell and at the dreariness of its walls and scant items of bedding and ablution facilities.
Students were puzzled when they recalled learning about the dignity shown by the political prisoners post-apartheid given the conditions under which they lived for decades.
Our school was filled with a genuine interest in the events that led to the incarceration of so many South Africans during the apartheid era. There is now a renewed interest in history in our students who are able to compare and contrast injustices in their own countries or in other countries around the world. This enabled us to talk about how we are similar and how we are different.
One of the most powerful outcomes that emanated from the use of the replica cell is the students’ deepening understanding of the term “triumph of the human spirit”. They started talking about the character traits that they would like to mirror in their own lives. To this end there was lots of enthusiastic chatter about resilience, bravery, tenacity, courage, humour, grace, fear and so much more.
History certainly is living, dynamic and serves as a ‘GPS’ that links where we come from to where we are headed.
Sincerely
Rene Fahrenfort
Year 6 teacher and head of mathematics International School of Cape Town Cape Town

Taking teaching and learning to the streets

We would like to share with you some news about innovation in education
South Africa’s biggest culinary school, Capsicum Culinary Studio, has launched its very own food trucks.
The Capsicum Combis will be run by the school’s students, giving them practical experience and teaching them to become successful entrepreneurs while earning a small income and, at the same time, providing customers with affordable and tasty street food.
Decked out in the school’s official red and white colours, the Capsicum Combis will also come fitted with a widescreen TV monitor on each roof to allow for the screening of demonstrations, videos and to advertise upcoming events.
We are very proud of the Capsicum Combis and we think it’s the perfect vehicle – excuse the pun – to teach our students how to run their own businesses and become entrepreneurs
Students will be in charge of running the kitchen in the combis, drawing up a list of food items that they will ultimately prepare and serve, and budgeting accordingly so that the enterprise runs as a successful and profitable concern.
We can guarantee you the food that the students will make and serve from the combi will be sustainable, seasonal, cost-effective, versatile and yum.
Currently, there are two Capsicum Combis, one based in Gauteng and the other – already dubbed the Capsicum Coastal Combi – will be rotated between the Durban, Port Elizabeth and Cape Town campuses.
For those living in Johannesburg, the red and white mobile kitchen can be spotted over the next few weeks in and around the city and suburbs dishing up fabulous fare to passers-by. Cape Town locales will be announced soon.
Sincerely
Janette Engelbrecht
Marketing manager: Capsicum Culinary School Cape Town Campus (Head Office)

Category: Winter 2019

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